Annapurna, Nepal

Annapurna, Nepal

 

Famous Annapurna is a section of the Himalaya mountain range, located in central Nepal. The name “Annapurna” is a Sanskrit name meaning “Goddess of the Harvests”. The massive 22,970+ foot (7,000+ meter) peaks of the Annapurna section are some of the most dangerous to climb in the world. The south face of Annapurna I has the highest fatality rate of all the world’s 8,000 meter or higher peaks. Though the peaks themselves are off-limits to most people, the surrounding scenery can be access by undertaking one of many popular multi-day treks, including the impressive Annapurna Circuit trek, the Kaligandaki River Valley trek, and the Annapurna Sanctuary trek which reaches the Annapurna Base Camp. Annapurna is located within the Annapurna Conservation Area Project, and a permit is required to visit. Permits can be obtained in the Nepalese cities of Pokhara and Kathmandu. Bus service from Pokhara is available, as are many guided tours for trekking.

Annapurna, Nepal

Credit: MoreAltitude

Annapurna, Nepal

Annapurna, Nepal

Annapurna, Nepal

Annapurna, Nepal

Credit: MoreAltitude

Annapurna, Nepal

Annapurna, Nepal

Annapurna, Nepal

Credit: Mike Behnken

Torres del Paine National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Cordillera del Paine, Patagonia, Chile

Torres del Paine is a national park located in south Patagonia, Chile. The park is known for its immense rock towers and peaks, part of the Andes mountain range. The name Torres del Paine means Towers of Blue (Paine is an indigenous name for the color blue). The most famous peaks in the park are Cordillera del Paine, a set of stark peaks, and the Cuernos del Paine (Horns of Blue), a set of jagged, horn-like mountain tops. Also in the park are a glacier, a lake, and rivers. The most popular activity in the park are the multi day hikes, especially the Base Of Las Torres trek. Tourists can reach the national park via dailiy bus service from the city of Puerto Natales. Accommodations in the park consist of basic lodgings called “Refugios” and camping.

Cuernos del Paine, Patagonia, Chile

Cuernos del Paine, Patagonia, Chile

Cordillera del Paine, Patagonia, Chile

Credit: Peter Essick of National Geographic

Torres del Paine, Patagonia, Chile

Cuernos del Paine, Patagonia, Chile

Cuernos del Paine, Patagonia, Chile

Torres del Paine, Patagonia, Chile

Torres del Paine, Patagonia, Chile

Mount Fuji, Japan

Mount Fuji, Japan

 

Mount Fuji is the highest mountain in Japan, standing an imposing 3,776.24 meters (12,389 feet) tall. It is considered an active volcano, with its last eruption in the early 1700s. Often depicted in Japanese art, the iconic mountain is well known as a symbol of Japan and is a prominent feature of Tokyo’s skyline. The well-formed cone of this stratovolcano is visually almost symmetrical. Climbing the mountain has become a popular excursion for tourists from around the world, with over 300,000 persons reaching the summit each year. Climbing between October and May is strongly discouraged due to the cold temperatures. Many climbers choose to make the climb at night in order to be at or near the summit for a breathtaking sunrise.

Mount Fuji, Japan

Mount Fuji, Japan

Mount Fuji, Japan

Mount Fuji, Japan

Mount Fuji, Japan

Credit: Dez

Mount Fuji, Japan

Mount Fuji, Japan

Mount Fuji, Japan

Mount Fuji, Japan

Matterhorn, Switzerland

Matterhorn, Switzerland

The Matterhorn is a large, jagged mountain standing 4,478 meters (14,692 ft) tall on the border of Switzerland and Italy. One of the highest peaks in the Pennine Alps, the Matterhorn is also known as Monte Cervino in Italian, or Mont Cervin in French. The mountain is famous for being one of the most deadly to summit, with over 500 climbers dying on it since it was first climbed in 1865. Today, many climbers summit the Matterhorn each year, and all the faces of the mountain have been ascended in all seasons, though even the easiest route to the top is considered a fairly difficult climb.

Matterhorn, Switzerland

Matterhorn, Switzerland

Matterhorn, Switzerland

Matterhorn, Switzerland

Matterhorn, Switzerland

Matterhorn, Switzerland

Credit: simonsimages

Matterhorn, Switzerland

Matterhorn, Switzerland

Matterhorn, Switzerland

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Snake River, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

In beautiful Wyoming you will find the breathtaking Grand Teton National Park, which features the 46 mile long Grand Teton mountain range. Grand Teton National Park is just 10 miles (16 km) south of Yellowstone National Park, and a visit to one should include a visit to the other. The park is named for Grand Teton mountain, the tallest mountain in the park at 13,775 feet (4,199 m). Grand Teton National Park has a rich history of Paleo-Indian and Native American settlements, dating to over 11,000 years ago. The park also has fascinating geography, with glaciated mountains, lakes, and valleys creating a unsurpassed landscape of beauty.

Mount Moran, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Mount Moran, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Jackson Lake, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Wind River Range, Wyoming, USA

Wind River Range, Wyoming

 

The stunning Wind River Range is a 100 mile long mountain range in Western Wyoming. It is part of the Rocky Mountains. Gannett Peak, the highest in Wyoming at 13,804 feet (4,207 m), is included in this mountain range. Gannett Peak can be climbed on a 4-6 day hike, and is not recommended for beginners. The Wind River Range is part of two National Forests: the Shoshone National Forest and the Bridger-Teton National Forest.

Wind River Range, Wyoming

Wind River Range, Wyoming

Credit: Don Paulson

Wind River Range, Wyoming

Wind River Range, Wyoming

Wind River Range, Wyoming

Credit: Oli

Monarch Ski Resort, Colorado

monarch-ski-resort-colorado

 

The ski and snowboard season is here, and Colorado has no shortage of resorts. Monarch Ski Resort is one of them, with its base located at a staggering 10,790 ft elevation, high in the Sawatch Range of the Colorado Rockies. At Monarch Ski Resort, you can enjoy carving fresh powder in the morning, break for lunch at one of their three fantastic restaurants, and head out to hit the terrain park in the afternoon. If you’re looking for something a little different, you can take a snowcat tour, or strap on your board and explore the 130 acre Mirkwood Basin for some extreme riding. For you veterans who are always looking to switch it up, Monarch Ski Resort is partnered with 17 different ski resorts that offer free days and deep discounts to Monarch Ski Resort season pass holders. So what are you waiting for? Slap some wax on that board and hit the slopes!

monarch-ski-resort-night-skiing-colorado

monarch-ski-resort-snowy-colorado

Mount Taranaki, New Zealand

Mount Taranaki, New Zealand

New Zealand’s north island is home to Mount Taranaki, or Mount Egmont, a 2,518 meter (8,261 ft) tall active volcano. Taranaki is quite young for a volcano, having become active only 135,000 years ago. Its most recent activity was a mere 160 years ago. Mount Taranaki is the center of the Egmont National Park, the circular tree-line boundary of which can be seen in two of the photos below. Visitors to the mountain can enjoy the Manganui ski resort for skiing and snowboarding. Those more adventurous types can trek to the summit during the summer months. The closest major town is New Plymouth, just north of the mountain, where all types of hotels and other accommodation can be found.

Mount Taranaki, New Zealand

Credit: C S

Mount Taranaki, New Zealand

Credit: jgraham

Mount Taranaki, New Zealand

Credit: Alex Cowley

Mount Taranaki, New Zealand

Credit: Jon Sullivan

Mount Taranaki, New Zealand

Credit: Mark

Mount Taranaki, New Zealand