Red Rocks of Sedona, Arizona, United States

The breathtaking Red Rocks of Sedona are a group of several limestone rock formations located near the city of Sedona in Arizona, United States. The rocks are known for the incredibly vibrant red and orange glow they exhibit when illuminated at sunrise and sunset. A few of the better known formations include Cathedral Rock, Devil’s Bridge natural arch, and the Devil’s Kitchen sinkhole. Visitors to Sedona can enjoy endless hiking and mountain biking trails in and around the rocks. A Red Rock Pass must be acquired from the Sedona Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center to use the trails.

Sedona, Arizona

Credit: Tom Lussier

Sedona, Arizona

Sedona, Arizona

Credit: Lee McCain

Sedona, Arizona

Sedona, Arizona

Sedona, Arizona

Yehliu, Taiwan

Yehliu is the name of a rocky cape on the northeast coast of Taiwan. The cape is known for the interesting rock formations that were formed when ocean waves eroded part of the rocky shore. The formations, called hoodoos, can be seen in the Yeliu Geopark. Some of the rock formations have names based on objects that resemble their shapes. The most famous hoodoo is called “the Queen’s Head.” Yehliu is within the town of Wanli which is between the cities of Taipei and Keelung.

Yehliu, Taiwan

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Yehliu, Taiwan

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Yehliu, Taiwan

Credit: WoayChee

Yehliu, Taiwan

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Yehliu, Taiwan

Yehliu, Taiwan

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Queen's Head, Yehliu, Taiwan

Credit: Sun Jack

Yehliu, Taiwan

Fingal’s Cave, Staffa, Scotland

Fingal's Cave, Staffa, Scotland

Credit: Jim Richardson of National Geographic

Fingal’s Cave is located on the uninhabited rock island of Staffa, off the West coast of Scotland. This fascinating cave is formed from hexagon shaped basalt columns. The basalt formed into hexagonal columns when a lava flow cooled in the ocean. The lava flow that created Fingal’s Cave also created the amazing Giant’s Causeway rock formation in Scotland. In Gaelic, Fingal’s Cave is known as Uamh-Binn, meaning “cave of melody”, due to the lovely sounds made by echos of waves crashing inside.

Fingal's Cave, Staffa, Scotland

Fingal's Cave, Staffa, Scotland

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Fingal's Cave, Staffa, Scotland

360° View - Fingal's Cave, Staffa, Scotland

Arches National Park, Utah, USA

Arches National Park, Utah

 

Utah is known for its impossible canyons and rock formations. Arches National Park in Eastern Utah is one of the most impressive. Here, natural sandstone arches, formed over millions of years when salt beds covered the area, create an amazing orange brown landscape. The area has a rich history as well as fascinating geology, it was home to the Ute and Paiute tribes. Ute petroglyphs from around 250 years ago can still be seen today. Bryce Canyon, also in Utah, should not be overlooked as a destination if beautiful rock formations captivate you.

Arches National Park, Utah

Arches National Park, Utah

Arches National Park, Utah

Arches National Park, Utah

Arches National Park, Utah

Giant’s Causeway, Ireland

Giant's Causeway, Ireland

Credit: Bill

The Giant’s Causeway is a magnificent basalt rock formation located on Ireland’s northeast coast. The tops of the incredible hexagonal basalt columns form stepping stones to the ocean. The Giant’s Causeway is preserved as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a National Nature Reserve in Ireland. Visitors to the area can also enjoy a ride on the historic Giant’s Causeway Tramway, a railway originally built in 1883. The nearest town to the Giant’s Causeway is the tiny community of Bushmills, only 3km (2 miles) north. The slightly larger towns of Ballycastle and Coleraine are also nearby. Belfast, the largest city and capital of Northern Ireland, is 95km (59 miles) to the south.

Giant's Causeway, Ireland

Credit: Jim Richardson of National Geographic

Giant's Causeway, Ireland

Giant's Causeway, Ireland

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Giant's Causeway, Ireland

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Giants Causeway, Ireland

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