The North Pole

The North Pole

 

The North Pole, once an almost mythical place visited only by the heartiest of explorers (and Santa Claus) is now a tourist destination. Though certainly not for everyone, those arctic lovers who are inclined can visit the North Pole by ship, helicopter, or submarine. The textbook definition of the North Pole is the point in the middle of the Arctic Ocean where the Earth’s axis of rotation meets the Earth’s surface. The North Pole is, of course, incredibly cold, though it is significantly warmer than the South Pole. Winter temperatures range from −43 °C (−45 °F) to −26 °C (−15 °F), and Summer temperatures average around the freezing point (0 °C, 32 °F). Tours to the North Pole can be found on a variety of specialty tour company websites.

The North Pole

The North Pole

The North Pole

Credit: Nick Hughes

The North Pole

The North Pole

The North Pole

The North Pole

6 comments ↓

  1. The first photo of the sun and moon must have been artificially created (i.e., it’s a fake). The moon and sun have the almost the same apparent size from Earth (this is clear if you’ve seen a solar eclipse), but in that picture the moon is something like 10 times at large.

    While it’s true that there can be an optical illusion that makes the moon seem bigger when it’s near the horizon, this optical illusion does not appear in photographs, and in any case it would never lead to a discrepancy as big as in that picture.

  2. Michael Brian Stone

    Hey Nick. Give me back my fun!

  3. i scheme it’d be possible for the moon to look like that so far from the equator. whoever took that. amazing.

  4. This kind of distortion can result from the digital zoom of cameras. In other words, if the photographer is standing on the shore and zooms it, the camera will simply enlarge whatever visual data it receives. You see this a lot in pictures of city lines where mountains are in the background.

    Take this image, for example: http://www.tacomamenus.com/images/tacoma_restaurant.jpg

    In this photograph, Mount Rainier appears to be only a few miles away with an frighteningly enormous mass. Rainier is actually some 30 miles away and even if you stand within city limits it doesn’t look this big. In this case, the photographer probably stood across the water and zoomed in toward the city line to make it look like the viewer is in the middle of the water looking at Tacoma with Rainier behind it. Again, with a digital zoom the camera just takes the visual imagery it captures and enlarges it.

    Hope that helps!

  5. The moon is closer to erth at the poles so its bigger.

  6. hmmm…
    really nice…

    my dream ..soon, at be there.

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